Monthly Archives: February 2018

  1. Ancient coins – Coinage of the Ancient Olympics

    The Colosseo Collection ……

    One of the few ancient traditions to survive until the modern world is the Ancient Olympics. Occurring in the same four-year cycle today as in antiquity, they mark a time when differences are put aside and the world’s attention focuses on athletic competition between nations.

    The name “Olympics” originates from where they were played. Olympia was a sanctuary of ancient Greece near the city of Elis, a fertile country in the northwest of the Peloponnese. It featured temples, sporting grounds, and accommodations for the athletes. The inhabitants of Elis were responsible for organizing the games every four years. The stadium at Olympia seated no less than 45 thousand, and the publicity for the winners was immense.

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  2. CoinWeek: Cool Coins! 2018 Episode 1: Amazing Mint Errors, Shipwreck Gold and More!

    CoinWeek Cool Coins! returns with this first episode for 2018.

    We are excited to share with you a new crop of cool stories about some of the most interesting coins, tokens, and medals that dealers and collectors show off on the bourse floor.

    Segment 1: Larry Shepherd talks about an original three-coin set of Bridgeport, Connecticut Centennial half dollars. You can view Larry’s complete inventory of coins on his website: http://www.simcocoins.com

    Segment 2: Jeff Shevlin and Charles talk about the interrelationship of So-Called Dollars and Classic Commemorative Coins. Jeff has a seldom-seen So-Called Dollar from the World’s Colombian Exposition of 1893 honoring the President of the Board of Lady Managers, Mrs. Potter Palmer.

    Segment 3: Russ Augustin from AU Capital Management always brings nice coins with him when he travels to a major coin show.

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  3. Ancient Coins – A Celebration of Music with a Greek “Guitar”

    Fearful of Athens and the growing power of the Macedonian Kingdom, Olynthus and the other free cities of the Chalcidice banded together in 432 BCE, forming the Chalcadian League as a defensive coalition. Athens failed to break up this union due to its focus on the Peloponnesian War and its general disinterest in the region, helping solidify the strength of the League.

    The capital was placed at Olynthus on a peninsula of northern Ancient Greece, on the shores of the Aegean Sea. The name “Olynthus” originates from the Greek olunthos, a fig which matures early, as this fruit was plentiful in the area.

    The Chalcadian League was at the height of its power in the late fifth century BCE but soon became the center of conflict. In 393 BCE, Amyntas III of Macedonia was under attack by the Illyrians and temporarily transferred territory to Olynthus for protection. When he regained control, the League refused to return his lands and he called upon Sparta to intervene.

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